My Attention Management System Conceptual Architecture

December 22, 2006 at 10:02 am | Posted in Attention Management, interruption science, presence, social software | 16 Comments

Below is the Attention Management System Conceptual Architecture that I presented at my telebriefing on Enterprise Attention Management earlier this month.

Enterprise Attention Management System

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  1. […] My Attention Management System Conceptual Architecture It has a nice conceptual architecture diagram. (tags: Attention Architecture) […]

  2. […] view is not wrong – I think it shows a difference in how presence is viewed.  A glance at my Enterprise Attention Management conceptual architecture shows we’re talking about different pieces.  From a UC point of view presence is about […]

  3. […] a set of these tips along with my own ideas and included them below. I used the components of my Enterprise Attention Management conceptual architecture (input, processing, throttle, output at a high level) as a structuring […]

  4. […] think search is an important enabler, but there are many other parts to the puzzle as well (see my EAM conceptual architecture for a more complete picture).  But the rest are wise words to live by.  Some of the […]

  5. […] like the idea of leveraging more of the EAM architecture by adding rules, filtering, profiles, and proactive discovery to the RSS model rather than using it […]

  6. […] and individuals can take real steps to manage their attention better (for enterprises see my Enterprise Attention Management conceptual architecture; for individuals my Personal Attention Management tips).  But I also believe in having an […]

  7. […] you’re in a business publication, talk about systematic changes that can improve the efficiency of a large number of workers rather than just personal tips on how […]

  8. […] Enterprise Attention Management Conceptual Architecture to the rescue!  Rather than relying on a set of personal pet peeves or specific annoyances […]

  9. […] The inability of people to focus attention on just the bits of information that deserve it and ignore the rest will never be solved.  But it can be managed, as my research (which has just begun to scratch the surface) has shown.  I continue to urge organizations – in particular those few people in organizations who can provide technical and cultural tools to large groups of information workers – to adopt attention management as a conceptual model. […]

  10. […] advice that helps organizations craft their own responses to their information environment (like my attention management conceptual architecture) rather than a stock set of rules that can’t possibly take an organization’s expectations, […]

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  14. […] my Attention Management System Conceptual Architecture to look across all inputs, processing, and outputs instead of relying on architects of small parts […]

  15. […] my Attention Management System Conceptual Architecture to look across all inputs, processing, and outputs instead of relying on architects of small parts […]


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